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Full Version: Downtune issue: 5 string? octave pedal?
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Adjusting your intonation means doing this

That should solve the issue of your D string sounding flat.
(06-16-2013, 05:15 AM)WCPhils Wrote: [ -> ]I tune to Drop C on my guitar all the time and have done the same on my 4 string bass. Have never had problems [Image: 3392635135.gif]
Do you leave your bass there for a long while? Because longterm, having a longer scale length is better. Required? No. But it is better.

(06-16-2013, 05:23 AM)Grungie Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-16-2013, 05:08 AM)crazysam23 Wrote: [ -> ]You do realize that most pros who tune down to Drop B on a 6 string have their guitar specifically set up for it?

You don't need to be a pro to have a guitar set up in a specific tuning.
No, but the point was that the pros have everything designed for Drop B, including scale length.

Quote:If you're using a 6 string in Drop B, just set it up and leave it that way. It's much better on your guitar than constantly changing the tuning on your guitar, though sadly not a lot of people can afford another guitar for that, but if they can, it's highly recommended.


None of this requires being a professional guitar tech. It also doesn't require an extended range, preference is one thing, but saying you need a 5 string because normal people can't tune to drop C is silly.
You're not considering my point about scale length though. I'm not saying that it's required to get a 5 string, btw. Just suggested.

Quote:Hell, I keep a guitar custom set in Eb with the Earnie Ball Beefy Pack which is half heavy and half medium. If I changed the tuning or string gauge, I have to adjust everything.
Mmhmm...

Quote:You're just making things more complicated than it needs to be Sam. Alternate tunings don't always require specialized guitars.
No, but when you start tuning below a certain range, it helps to have a longer scale length. That is, after all, why 7 string guitars have a longer scale length and why 8 string guitars have an even longer scale length than that.

@debbie:
I don't really like using pedals over (in this case) tuning it properly. I don't think it would give a good tone. Pedals can be good in limited applications, but an octave pedal generally isn't going to give a good tone for any low notes. If you don't hate the tone, the rest of your band is probably going to notice that you'd sound like ass.

Also Grungie pointed out, intonation is part of re-tuning.
Define "designed for drop B" since some of them use a standard 6 string instead of a baritone for drop B. the only "special" thing they do is more than likely have it set up with heavier strings. Nothing "specialized"
(06-16-2013, 04:49 PM)Grungie Wrote: [ -> ]Define "designed for drop B" since some of them use a standard 6 string instead of a baritone for drop B. the only "special" thing they do is more than likely have it set up with heavier strings. Nothing "specialized"
They have guitars with a longer scale length, for one. Also, I'm sure many of them have bridges and nuts designed for heavier strings. (The former is especially good if they're using a floyd rose style bridge, for intonation reasons.) Of course, having a nut for heavier strings isn't really specialized.


But you keep acting like longer scale length isn't important. If that were the case, we could just have all bass guitars at the same scale length as a standard 24-fret guitar (~24 inches). Obviously, most basses tend to be ~30 inches. Longer scale length and lower notes basically feed into each other. It just makes things easier longterm to have a longer scale length for lower notes. And, as musicians, since part of our goal is ease of care for our instruments longterm, scale length plays a part in that. Go to your local guitar store and ask to talk to the guitar tech. If he or she is knowledgeable, they'll tell you more than I can about it, I'm sure.
(06-16-2013, 04:59 PM)crazysam23 Wrote: [ -> ]They have guitars with a longer scale length, for one.

I just said that some of them don't. I've seen some use a standard PRS and a Telecaster that don't have longer necks. They more than likely have heavier gauge strings (unless they're fond of slack like Adam Jones) and maybe a nut if the heavy strings don't fit.

And for my address to the rest of your pissy fit you're having, you're stating your preferences as a requirement, it's not a requirement, they're all preferences. You don't need a baritone to play in Drop B, and you don't need a 5 string to play in drop C. You're proposing these as fact and I'm telling you they're preferences. The extended range is there for people who prefer the longer scale length for lower tunings, but some people also prefer standard guitars and basses for lower tunings. Neither of these are requirements. So yes, extended range isn't necessary, but some people prefer the extended range which is why they exist because some people find it easier to have a baritone/5 string for lower tunings, but not everyone does. Jim Root prefers a regular 6 string for drop B, but Pete Leoffler from Chevelle prefers a baritone.

Though the use of a 5 string bass/7 string and 8 string guitars is different than having something like a baritone. Obviously there are playing styles that require the use of extra strings (imagine trying to play Animals as Leaders without an 8 string), but personally I think it's a waste to buy a 7 or 8 string if you're just going to chug on lower notes. You're better off just detuning a 6 string or use a baritone (especially since you don't have to buy 7/8 strings packs).

Some people feel that it's easier to have a baritone guitar for drop B, but you don't have to have one. Talk to your local guitar tech, if he or she is knowledgeable, they'll tell you more about it better than you can I'm sure.
(06-16-2013, 05:16 PM)Grungie Wrote: [ -> ]And for my address to the rest of your pissy fit you're having, you're stating your preferences as a requirement, it's not a requirement, they're all preferences.
I think you're misinterpreting me here (probably because I got too wordy, my bad). I'm not saying it's a requirement. I'm saying it could make things easier. Not that all of that is required or that it's for everyone. Confusedhrug:

Quote:but personally I think it's a waste to buy a 7 or 8 string if you're just going to chug on lower notes. You're better off just detuning a 6 string or use a baritone (especially since you don't have to buy 7/8 strings packs).
I agree.

Quote:Some people feel that it's easier to have a baritone guitar for drop B, but you don't have to have one.
No, you don't.

Quote:Talk to your local guitar tech, if he or she is knowledgeable, they'll tell you more about it better than you can I'm sure.
Touche!

But they may still advise you to get a baritone guitar. Just saying. Whether you want to or not, of course, is up to you.
Well looks like this is settled, now for Debbie's problem.
Hahaha, it's OK.

I'll just settle this with the tech guy at the store, he is a professional session musician. I would however like to hear Adam's 2c on my predicament as well. But thanks you two, I appreciate the "almost turning my thread into a shitstorm" ride.
Tongue It's what I do...lel.
Dunno if you already figured this out (hell i'm not reading this whole thread) but don't get an octave pedal, that's for sure. They don't sound very good and aren't meant to be used instead of downtuning, they're meant to help you sound like 2 people and more full.

Now, down tuning isn't that hard, just a little tweaking involved.

However if you're getting a new bass i think getting a 5 string would prove much more useful.
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